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By Kyle Hanko
September 1, 2016
ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA - JULY 30:  New cars are parked on the lot at the Holden manufacturing plant at Elizabeth on July 30, 2013 in Adelaide, Australia. Holden, a subsidiary of American car giant General Motors recently reduced its staff in Adelaide by 400, in an effort to reduce operating costs. Holden and other local car manufacturers have received years of both federal and state government grants, and PM Kevin Rudd recently said he was  ...determined to see this industry survive into the future.   (Photo by Morne de Klerk/Getty Images)
ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA - JULY 30: New cars are parked on the lot at the Holden manufacturing plant at Elizabeth on July 30, 2013 in Adelaide, Australia. Holden, a subsidiary of American car giant General Motors recently reduced its staff in Adelaide by 400, in an effort to reduce operating costs. Holden and other local car manufacturers have received years of both federal and state government grants, and PM Kevin Rudd recently said he was "...determined to see this industry survive into the future." (Photo by Morne de Klerk/Getty Images)
Morne de Klerk—Getty Images

Thinking about buying a new car? Money has crunched some of the numbers for you.

The average price of new cars and SUVs is at an all-time high…and so is the average size of the loans that people are taking out to buy them.

Looking for additional safety features in your brand new car? You’ll have to pay up for them. Some useful and effective safety features—such as a backup camera, inflatable seat belts, a rear-parking sensor, adaptive headlights, and automatic emergency brakes—will cost you several thousand dollars when you add them all up.

On the bright side, you can enjoy some big tax benefits by purchasing a car with eco-friendly features.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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