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By George Mannes
November 7, 2016

For many Americans, the presidency of the United States represents the ultimate glass ceiling, and the possibility that Hillary Clinton might be elected president means that the ultimate American glass ceiling might be broken.

Read more: Can You Name the Women Who Broke Through These Glass Ceilings?

One week before the election, Money took to the streets of Manhattan to ask a cross-section of people what effect that a Clinton presidency might have on other glass ceilings in other workplaces around the country.

But, as one participant pointed out, another glass ceiling in American culture was broken not so long ago, and we shouldn’t forget about the importance of that one.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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