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By Alicia Adamczyk and Lauren Wood
July 28, 2016
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton delivers remarks via a video screen on the second day of the 2016 Democratic National Convention at Wells Fargo Center on July 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton delivers remarks via a video screen on the second day of the 2016 Democratic National Convention at Wells Fargo Center on July 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Paul Morigi—WireImage/Getty Images

On Thursday night, Hillary Clinton will make history as the first woman to accept the nomination as a presidential candidate by a major U.S. political party.

It will be an awe-inspiring moment, and not just because of its historic import. In the U.S., women still hold few positions of power: they comprise less than 20% of Congress, less than 5% of Fortune 500 CEO spots, and hold just six governorships.

Back in 2008, when Clinton first ran for president but ultimately conceded to Barack Obama, she said,

Read Next: All the Countries That Have Had a Female Head of State (Before the U.S.)

Of course, while Clinton is breaking a path for young women who come after her, she didn’t arrive here on her own. She stands on the shoulders of barrier-breakers who came before her, such as German Chancellor Angela Merkel and the late British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Not to mention trailblazers like Indira Gandhi, the first and only woman to lead India, and still earlier pioneers like suffragettes Ida B. Wells and Elizabeth Cady Stanton and abolitionist Harriet Tubman.

While you may be familiar with some of those figures, there are plenty of other history-making women whose names are less well known. Think you can guess who came first in fields of science, business, entertainment, and more? Take this quiz to find out.

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

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Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

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