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By Martha C. White
September 14, 2016
Bloomberg—Bloomberg/Getty Images

It’s not just Mylan’s beleaguered CEO Heather Bresch who’s been raking it in while hiking the price of the lifesaving EpiPen. Several of Mylan’s top executives have been pulling down enormous paychecks as EpiPen price hikes led to rising profits, even while families scrambled to afford the medication.

Between 2011 and 2015, Mylan’s top five executives earned a collective $292.1 million, according to calculations by the Wall Street Journal. The company’s regulatory filings attempt to show that this was reasonable for the industry, but the other pharmaceutical companies it compared itself to — firms like Johnson & Johnson and Pfizer — were all much bigger than Mylan, and they still paid their top brass less during that five year period.

Mylan has hiked the price of an EpiPen by more than 500% in less than 10 years — even though drug manufacturing experts say each one probably only costs Mylan about $30 to make. The company has defended both its EpiPen price hikes and high executive pay, blaming middlemen and high-deductible health plans for patient outrage over the drug price, and saying its compensation reflects the company’s performance — although critics are quick to point out that performance relies to a significant degree on those very same price increases.

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

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