Many companies featured on Money advertise with us. Opinions are our own, but compensation and
in-depth research determine where and how companies may appear. Learn more about how we make money.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

By Allana Akhtar
January 4, 2018
The hundreds of thousands of people regularly playing HQ Trivia are trying to increase their odds of winning the big prize.
The hundreds of thousands of people regularly playing HQ Trivia are trying to increase their odds of winning the big prize.
franckreporter—Getty Images

Fans of HQ Trivia, you many want to sit down for this.

It turns out there’s a loophole in the wildly popular app-based game that’s preventing some of the game’s winners from actually taking home their earnings.

This means HQ winner Lauren May, whose emotional reaction to winning $11.30 went viral this week, needs to win again to actually claim her prize—not an easy thing to do.

The game has drawn as many as 750,000 participants, all competing for a piece of a cash jackpot. Yet HQ splits each prize (currently offered twice daily) among everyone who correctly answers all 12 of the game’s questions—and it doesn’t pay out the prize money if a winner has pocketed less than $20, in total.

That leaves some HQ players (sometimes referred to as “HQties” by the app’s charming part-time host, Scott Rogowsky) coming up short.

HQ does spell out the $20 minimum cash-out in two places: both in its terms and conditions and under the game’s FAQs.

Representatives from HQ Trivia have not responded to multiple requests for an explanation of the policy. But the $20 minimum doesn’t appear to originate with PayPal, which does not require the third-party apps that use its service to clear any minimum payments, company spokesman Josh Criscoe told Money.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

EDIT POST