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By Alicia Adamczyk
February 3, 2017
DOMINICK REUTER—AFP/Getty Images

Donald Trump will meet with top business leaders Friday morning to discuss business issues ranging from taxes to regulation. But it’s his curious picks for advice on women in the workforce that have drawn critics’ attention.

Walmart CEO Doug McMillon and EY CEO Mark Weinberger are the headliners for a discussion on women’s workplace issues, according to the Wall Street Journal. There is no context offered for why McMillon and Weinberger were selected. EY has been a leader in the financial sector on issues like generous paid parental leave policies and other perks for male and female employees.

Meanwhile, women leaders will discuss other business issues with Trump, including General Motors CEO Mary Barra, IBM CEO Ginni Rometty, and Pepsi Co. CEO Indra Nooyi.

This comes as Trump is under fire for reportedly telling female staffers they need to “dress like women” in the White House, according to Axios, a new politics website.

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

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