Many companies featured on Money advertise with us. Opinions are our own, but compensation and
in-depth research determine where and how companies may appear. Learn more about how we make money.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

By Alicia Adamczyk
February 5, 2016
Glass of water with a tablet dissolving in it
Glass of water with a tablet dissolving in it
Martin Barraud—Getty Images/OJO Images RF

Expect your office to be a bit emptier come 9 a.m. Monday.

According to a 2008 report, over 1.5 million workers will call in sick the day after the Super Bowl, and millions more will be late. Maybe it’s the reported 325 million gallons of beer Americans will consume — or the 1.3 billion chicken wings. Whatever the case, that’s a lot of lost productivity.

So what can employers do to ensure the day isn’t a wash? One expert says you could punish those who had a bit too much fun Sunday night—or throw a party instead.

Tim Eisenhauer, the president of Axero Solutions and a workplace collaboration expert, says it could benefit employers to embrace the sluggishness and “nurse the hangovers.”

“Provide breakfast and turn the morning or even the entire day into a morale building-slash-employee-engagement-slash-get-together-slash-get-to-know-each-other-at-work day,” Eisenhauer suggests. “You could make it a day of fun and play, and bring in a comedian, a funny speaker, a musician, (or) a spread of food.”

Too often, Eisenhauer says, an employer’s assumptions about what will make them successful are overly strict. Hard work is well and good, but incorporating a bit of fun can also be beneficial to your bottom line.

Plus, providing a breakfast or some other type of socializing event is a great way for your workers to get to know each other, particularly at a large organization. And that could lead to even greater productivity down the line.

“Make it a point that your people walk out of every corporate event knowing more coworkers than they did when they walked in,” he says. “Well-networked employees are happy employees.”

Naturally these suggestions depend on your company culture, but if you’re looking for a way to boost morale, free bagels and coffee never hurts.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

EDIT POST