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By Rob Wile
February 5, 2018
Nick Foles #9 of the Philadelphia Eagles celebrates with the Lombardi Trophy after defeating the New England Patriots 41-33 in Super Bowl LII at U.S. Bank Stadium on February 4, 2018 in Minneapolis.
Nick Foles #9 of the Philadelphia Eagles celebrates with the Lombardi Trophy after defeating the New England Patriots 41-33 in Super Bowl LII at U.S. Bank Stadium on February 4, 2018 in Minneapolis.
Mike Ehrmann—Getty Images

Five years ago, Nick Foles was set to retire.

But on Sunday, in one of the biggest upsets in NFL history, the Philadelphia Eagle’s backup quarterback led his team to a Super Bowl victory against the five-time champion New England Patriots with a final score of 41-33.

Foles, 29, was named the Super Bowl’s MVP and also became the first quarterback to both throw and catch a touchdown pass in a Super Bowl. It’s also the first Super Bowl win for the city of Philadelphia.

Foles will get a good bit of prize money for the Super Bowl win—but it will be just as much as everyone else on the Eagles.

Thanks to the players’ collective bargaining agreement with the league, Foles will make exactly as much as the rest of his team for winning the Super Bowl: $112,000. Each Patriots player—including Tom Brady—gets half that just for having made it to the big game.

That’s in addition to the $79,000 the Eagles and Patriots have already made for winning their two previous playoff games.

Last March, Foles, who joined the Eagles as the backup to Carson Wentz, signed a 2-year, $11 million contract with the team that included a $3 million signing bonus, according to pro sports tracking site Spotrac. He earned $4 million for the 2017-2018 season.

Foles also won the Super Bowl MVP award. Unfortunately, the prize no longer comes with a free car, but it does likely mean that Foles will start receiving many more endorsement offers.

One endorsement Foles already has in the bag: Disney. As SBNation reports, the tradition of the Super Bowl champ announcing his trip to Disney World—which is subsequently used in an ad the week after the big game—continues today.

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

EDIT POST