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By Donna Rosato
February 18, 2015
Gregory Reid

Welcome to Day 2 of Money’s 10-day Financial Fitness program. Yesterday, you did a self-assessment to see what kind of financial shape you’re in. Today, we help you find the motivation to take your finances to the next level.

Okay, you’ve checked your vitals, and you’re probably feeling pretty good about your starting point. According to Gallup’s annual Personal Financial Situation survey, 56% of people in households earning $75,000 or more say they are better off financially now than they were a year ago, up from 44% who felt that way in January 2014.

But just as even the most devoted gym-goer can get complacent, your financial confidence could stop you from reaching the next level. “In good economic times people save less and spend more,” says Dan Geller, a behavioral finance expert and the author of Money Anxiety. Keep the eye of the tiger even when you’re doing great. Here’s how.

1. Make a Specific Goal

When you show up at the gym without a plan, there’s a good chance you’ll shuffle on the treadmill for a half-hour and call it a day. Your financial life is no different. To boost your performance, start by zeroing in on a goal. A study by Gail Matthews, a psychology professor at Dominican University, found that you’re 42% more likely to achieve your aims just by writing them down. Indeed, people with a written financial plan save more than twice as much as those without a plan, says a Wells Fargo survey. The more specific the goal, the easier it is to tackle. Rather than plan to “cut costs,” focus on, say, paying off your mortgage five years early.

2. Buddy Up

Much as a workout partner provides motivation to get to the gym, recruiting a family member or friend to hold you accountable is a good way to stay on track. In another study by Matthews, some participants shared their goals with a friend via weekly updates—achieving their aims 33% more often than those who did not.

3. Get a Nudge

Sometimes you just need a reminder. A study by the Center for Retirement Research found that bank account holders who got reminders about their savings goals put away more cash than people who didn’t. It’s easy to set recurring calendar reminders on your PC or phone, or try a service like FollowUpThen.com, which lets you schedule emails to your future self.

4. Stickk It

Need something with more teeth? The website Stickk.com allows you to pledge a sum of money toward a goal, sign a commitment contract, and pick a friend to monitor your progress. Achieve your aim, and you get the money back. Miss it, and you lose the money, which is donated to charity or a friend.

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Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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