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By Kyle Hanko
September 13, 2016

Despite a spate of recent problems, it seems all but inevitable that self-driving cars will soon be sharing the road with vehicles being operated by humans. In this video, USA Today ventures out to Ford World Headquarters in Dearborn, Michigan, to get a ride in a prototype of a fully autonomous Ford Fusion.

This model features next-generation sensors that utilize so-called LiDAR, or “laser radar,” which purportedly do a better job than previous technologies at getting passengers where they need to go—safely.

Read More: Tesla Says Updated Autopilot Might Have Prevented Driver Death

The Ford Fusion you’ll see in USA Today’s test drive is equipped with a steering wheel and gas and brake pedals—but Ford says those features will no longer be necessary when fully autonomous Ford Fusions are ultimately released, which is expected to be in 2021.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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