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By Ethan Wolff-Mann
January 25, 2016
AFC Championship - New England Patriots v Denver Broncos
Peyton Manning will lead the Denver Broncos against the Carolina Panthers in Super Bowl 50.
Dustin Bradford—Getty Images

The big question of who we’ll see in Super Bowl 50 (not “L”!) has been resolved, much to the chagrin of the Patriots and Cardinals. After Sunday’s conference championship games, we now know that the Denver Broncos and the Carolina Panthers will square off in Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif., on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016.

And as you’d probably guess, it’s going to cost a lot if you want to see the action in person.

Buying Super Bowl tickets is not for the faint of heart, or slim of wallet. The average price of a ticket on the secondary market for this year’s game is $6,007, according to the resale aggregation and research site TiqIQ. Last year’s average ticket, featuring the New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks, did slightly more damage at $6,104 per head.

Of course, the average ticket price is buoyed by the fancy seats–you can see the action without resorting to a television for a mere $3,279. That’s the cheapest “get-in” price, according to TiqIQ. On the other hand, the most expensive ticket listed on the secondary market is now $22,670, per SeatGeek.com.

Bear in mind that these prices are subject to change, perhaps dramatically, based on supply and demand as the big game draws nearer. Last year, fans hoping to attend the Super Bowl faced wild fluctuations in ticket prices. Soon after it was determined that the game would feature the Patriots and Seahawks, ticket prices on the secondary market were averaging “only” about $2,900. Before too long, however, with much shady resale activity taking place in the days before kickoff, average asking prices soared into the $9,000 range.

Read next: The Shady Story Behind Soaring Super Bowl Ticket Prices

Of course, going to the big game costs more than the ticket. Priceline tallied up an average cost for a flight into the Bay area between $313 to $531. (It’s not really an average but it might be helpful for estimation purposes.) San Jose is the cheapest and closest airport, according to NBC News.

And there’s the hotel room, which Priceline says could cost $65 to $746 in San Francisco or $95 to $999 in Silicon Valley. Those ranges are massive and not particularly helpful, but you get the idea: The Super Bowl is expensive. Very expensive.