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By Alicia Adamczyk
July 12, 2016
A bird lands on Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders podium as he speaks on March 25, 2016 in Portland, Oregon. Sanders spoke to a crowd of more than eleven thousand about a wide range of issues, including getting big money out of politics, his plan to make public colleges and universities tuition-free, combating climate change and ensuring universal health care.Behring/Getty Images)
A bird lands on Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders podium as he speaks on March 25, 2016 in Portland, Oregon. Sanders spoke to a crowd of more than eleven thousand about a wide range of issues, including getting big money out of politics, his plan to make public colleges and universities tuition-free, combating climate change and ensuring universal health care.Behring/Getty Images)
Natalie Behring/Getty Images

Despite gaining popularity for disparaging the 1% and vowing to get money out of politics, Bernie Sanders’ campaign received on Sunday a 1,000-page list of names of donors who contributed more than the legal limit during the primary season from the Federal Elections Commission.

The limit is set at $2,700 per individual per election. According to The Atlantic, this is the fifth time that Bernie Sanders — who just endorsed Hillary Clinton on Tuesday — has received a notice about the over-the-limit contributions.

As The Atlantic noted, this may have happened because of the intense support Sanders garnered in a relatively short period of time. His enthusiastic supporters were likely not familiar with the intricacies of campaign finance law, and didn’t know there was such a cap on individual donations. The campaign has been returning funds over the $2,700 mark.

Read More: How Much Money Failed Presidential Candidates Have Blown Through This Election

The Atlantic also noted that Shia LaBeouf, he of Even Stevens, and, later, performance art fame, gave Sanders $6,015 in March. The Sanders campaign returned the excess $3,315 in May, but LaBeouf had already donated more money. Apparently Shia is very much feelin’ the Bern.

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