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By Alicia Adamczyk
April 12, 2016
Getty Images/Hero Images

It’s Equal Pay Day, the symbolic point in the year that marks how long the average women has to work in the new year to catch up to the average man’s earnings from the previous year—given that women make 78 cents for every dollar a man makes in the U.S.

So how can we beat the wage gap? Some companies, including Salesforce and Buffer, are taking it upon themselves to evaluate how (and how much) they’re paying employees, and are committed to bridging the gap from within, one employee at a time. Other experts think it’s less about what employers can do, and more important for women to take it upon themselves to ask for more (and hope they don’t get penalized for being “too aggressive”). Still others suggest a radical rethinking of how compensation works across all companies.

As we wait for the structural issues to play out, what better way to wage war against the wage gap than by making a lot of money? As Beyoncé reminds us, the best revenge (against deeply ingrained gender discrimination) is your paper.

To that end, here are the 20 best-paying jobs for women who don’t make millions headlining the Super Bowl halftime show. We used data from PayScale’s report on the best-paying jobs for women with five to eight years of experience, which included only those fields in which women hold at least 40% of the jobs.

These are the 20 best-paying professions for women right now:

Occupation Women’s Median Yearly Cash Compensation
Total, full-time wage and salary workers (per BLS) $39,624
Physician / Doctor, General Practice $165,000
Pediatrician, General $154,000
Pharmacist $117,000
Corporate Counsel $115,000
Vice President (VP), Marketing $106,000
Optometrist $105,000
Vice President (VP), Human Resources (HR) $103,000
Psychiatric Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner (ARNP) $101,000
Internal Auditing Manager $96,100
Physician Assistant (PA) $94,600
Compliance Director $93,400
Senior Clinical Research Associate (CRA) $93,000
Nurse Practitioner (NP) $92,900
Adult Nurse Practitioner (ANP) $92,200
Category Manager $90,300
Project Management Director $89,300
Senior Marketing Manager $88,200
Product Marketing Manager $87,700
Auditing Manager $87,000
Associate Attorney $86,800

Read Next: These Are the States Where Women Earn the Most Money

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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