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By Alicia Adamczyk
September 26, 2016
Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump
Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump
AFP—AFP/Getty Images

For many voters, their primary concern of the 2016 election is which candidate will be better for an economy. Can Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton reinvigorate a sluggish economy, or will Republican nominee Donald Trump “Make America Great Again”?

A new study from WalletHub analyzed economic indicators such as GDP growth and annual poverty rate change under each presidential administration from 1950 and 2015. In another vote for the importance of bipartisanship, WalletHub determined that the economy has performed best overall with a Democratic president and a Republican Congress.

Read Next: Hillary Clinton’s Bid for the Economic Hearts of the Middle Class

It may seem strange given Washington’s current state of gridlock, but WalletHub’s report found that the stock market, poverty rates, income growth, and national debt as percentage of GDP all perform better with a Dem in the Oval Office and a Republican-controlled Congress.

Read Next: How to Watch Tonight’s Presidential Debate Without Cable

If you’re worried about whether a Democratic or Republican presidential candidate will adversely impact your financial well-being, take a deep breath. As Money reported, stocks generally rise no matter who’s in office. The biggest factor impacting your investment portfolio is how you react to the outcome of the election. As my colleague Taylor Tepper wrote, “the S&P 500 index has finished up in more than two-thirds of all calendar years since 1926, a period that’s seen eight Republican and seven Democratic Presidents.”

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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