Many companies featured on Money advertise with us. Opinions are our own, but compensation and
in-depth research determine where and how companies may appear. Learn more about how we make money.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

By Katie Meyer
July 22, 2016

Karen Anderson created one tiny door for her neighborhood in Atlanta, Georgia, sat back, and waited to see how people would respond. It took a few weeks, she says, but one day she went to check on the door, and discovered that someone had left her a little surprise. Her free and public art project had found its audience.

That one door has grown to nine, spread out to Inman Park, the Old Fourth Ward, Cabbagetown, Reynoldstown, and around the BeltLine. Anderson doesn’t choose where the doors live; she leaves that up to her audience. Companies send her requests, and she works with them to create the perfect door. Each door costs about $600. That money comes from donations and the companies that make the request. Anderson herself does not get paid to make the doors for the public.

To support herself, Anderson speaks publicly about Tiny Doors ATL. She has also started making tiny doors for corporate clients. MailChimp was her most recent client.

Her advice for artists is to find the resources that will help you achieve your dream. The right people will take you and your art seriously. You just need to find them.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

EDIT POST