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By Katie Meyer
October 13, 2016
Dan Dalton—Getty Images/Caiaimage

If a man and a woman buy something similar—a pair of jeans, for example—the product marketed to women will nearly always cost more. This phenomenon is called the “pink tax.” Many people, especially men, aren’t aware of its existence.

Another thing that men aren’t aware of is the cost of items usually purchased only by women: Makeup, nail polish, tampons, and bras, for example.

Money set up a little game — a battle of the sexes, if you will — to see whether men and women know what they are each paying for everyday items such as jeans, dry cleaning, and makeup. It turns out that prices for men’s and women’s items are a mystery to both men and women.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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