Many companies featured on Money advertise with us. Opinions are our own, but compensation and
in-depth research determine where and how companies may appear. Learn more about how we make money.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

By Ethan Wolff-Mann
October 29, 2015
Pike Place Public Market, Seattle
Pike Place Public Market, Seattle
D A Barnes—Alamy

Along with tuna, salmon is one of America’s most popular fish. It’s delicious and healthy (it’s a superfood), but it has one major downside—it’s extremely expensive, costing up to $25 a pound for wild salmon, and about half that for the farmed variety.

While one Washington Post taste test actually gave the edge to farmed salmon, wild salmon is generally more prized because it’s considered more natural, so people are willing to pay a hefty premium for it. But according to a new report from Oceana, 43% of “wild” salmon sold out of season (i.e. in winter) is actually mislabeled farmed salmon.

Using DNA testing on 82 samples from restaurants and grocery stores around the country, Oceana found that a huge amount of the fish marked as “Alaskan” or “Pacific” was actually farmed in the Atlantic. When the organization did a similar study two years ago during peak salmon season, only 7% was mislabeled.

So if you want wild salmon for your summer backyard barbecue, you can be pretty sure that’s what you’re getting. Otherwise, you might want to consider just buying farmed. You’ll spend less, and it’s not any more dangerous to eat.

Read next: 29 Ways to Save Hundreds on Groceries

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

EDIT POST