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By Ethan Wolff-Mann
March 2, 2016
Ching, Nelson—Bloomberg/Getty Images

Every day it seems like Anheuser Busch-InBev and SABMiller, the world’s #1 and $2 biggest beer manufacturers that are in the process of merging to become an even bigger company, acquire yet another beer brand to add to the portfolio.

Today, however, it was in the news for the opposite reason. In order SABMiller got a little smaller by selling its stake in the most popular beer in the world, which isn’t Budweiser or Coors Light or any brand Americans are likely to have heard of.

It’s a Chinese beer called Snow that holds the title for overall most sales by volume. According to Reuters, SABMiller just sold its 49% stake in Snow back to China Resources Beer, which owns the rest, in order to smooth the SABMiller-InBev merger.

The news had us wondering what the world’s most popular beer actually tastes like. Apparently, we’re not really missing out. “I believe it tasted like a Bud Light,” says Matt Allyn, a Certified Beer Judge and co-author of Brewer’s Apprentice.

If you’re a data type, it got a 66—overall rating of “poor”—among reviewers at Beer Advocate. “Good for washing down the food,” is one of the most complimentary comments. Maybe it’s a good thing Snow isn’t sold in the U.S. We have enough mediocre beer.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

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