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By Turner Cowles
September 18, 2015

Teresa Ghilarducci, an economist who directs the Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis at the New School in New York, doesn’t eat dessert the way you do. Instead, she assembles a concoction for free, avoiding the high-markup items on the menu. “I like it because I know I’m getting something free, and I’m not giving the restaurant a really high profit margin,” she says. This gives her pleasure, and more pleasure than she would have by eating no dessert at all. “There’s nothing fun about being frugal,” says Ghilarducci, an expert on retirement security and author of the forthcoming book How to Retire with Enough Money, and How to Know What Enough Is.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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