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Published: May 20, 2022 6 min read

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A trader works at the New York Stock Exchange NYSE in New York, the United States, May 18, 2022
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Inflation is sky high, recession worries run rampant, and stocks are getting pummeled. Your first impulse may be to join the selloff, but it's actually extra important that you keep your money invested right now.

If you're invested in stocks and constantly checking on your portfolio, you probably haven't had a great few weeks. The S&P 500 dipped into bear market territory on Friday, the Dow Jones Industrial Average is down around 15% for the year, and the tech-heavy Nasdaq has fallen 28% in 2022.

Even though the market declines may make you feel uneasy, keeping your money in the stock market now is likely a good move long term. That's because the market's best days tend to happen right around the market's worst days. Between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2021, seven of the S&P 500's best days occurred within just two weeks of the index's 10 worst days, according to J.P. Morgan Asset Management's 2022 "Guide to Retirement" report.

"The pendulum in the stock market swings very, very wildly," says Jack Manley, a global strategist at J.P. Morgan Asset Management. "When things get out of whack, they swing back very quickly."

Why the stock market's best days are so close to the worst days