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By Taylor Tepper
June 16, 2016
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York on May 27, 2016.
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York on May 27, 2016.
Michael Nagle—Bloomberg/Getty Images

Every day, high speed traders are buying stocks quicker than the average long-term investor, and selling them back at marked-up prices. IEX says it aims to level the playing field in the stock market by eliminating advantages for high-speed traders.

IEX is a stock market alternative that says it will protect the average investor. IEX creates a “speed bump” to slow down trading so traders can’t use relatively higher speeds to their advantage. This delay slows every trader down by 350 millionths of a second. The “speed bump” will have little effect on investors looking for a long-term investment, says IEX.

Brad Katsuyama, President and CEO of IEX, hopes to have IEX approved by the Securities and Exchange Commission later this month.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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