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By Ethan Wolff-Mann
November 23, 2015
Constance Bannister Corp/Getty Images

It sounds too good to be true, no more legit than some pleading email from a Nigerian Prince requesting a “small sum” of $15,000. But it is. If you had a baby on Oct. 19, 2015, you are eligible for a free, no-strings attached $500 mutual fund.

Part of a promotion from the financial advice company Voya, parents with lucky babies born on that day have until Dec. 18, 2015 to enroll their kids to cash in.

The date of Oct. 19 is a little random, but not for the reasons you might think. Though you’d probably never know it, it’s the Monday of “National Save for Retirement Week,” which isn’t something I just made up.

To drive their point home about saving further, Voya commissioned a survey, which found that around a third of new parents would rather receive a financial gift for their kids than a “traditional” present. But unless the kids are given cool adult toys, that’s not so surprising. And it certainly never hurts to start saving early!

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Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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