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By Jennifer Calfas
July 19, 2017
TUCSON, AZ - APRIL 4:  A shopper pushes a cart through the aisles of a Costco store April 4, 2008 in Tucson, Arizona.  As the American economy slows down, consumers are increasingly turning to thrifty measures to push their money further.  Costco stores sell items in bulk, often reducing costs.  (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
TUCSON, AZ - APRIL 4: A shopper pushes a cart through the aisles of a Costco store April 4, 2008 in Tucson, Arizona. As the American economy slows down, consumers are increasingly turning to thrifty measures to push their money further. Costco stores sell items in bulk, often reducing costs. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
Chris Hondros—Getty Images

Step aside, Ikea.

Costco is America’s favorite store for home furnishings, according to a new survey from Market Force Information.

Costco, known for its discounted bulk items, scored a 72% composite loyalty score among those surveyed, and Ikea came in a close second with 70%. Target, T.J. Maxx and Kohl’s completed the top five stores for home furnishings.

Market Force Information surveyed 3,467 consumers in the month of May, asking each person to rate their satisfaction at each store and whether they would recommend it to others.

However, Ikea beat Costco and other stores for the categories of most selection and best value. Costco beat the competition in store employee availability.

Target won the highest ranks for customer service, courteousness and friendliness from employees, check-out speed and overall speed.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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