Many companies featured on Money advertise with us. Opinions are our own, but compensation and
in-depth research determine where and how companies may appear. Learn more about how we make money.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

By Denver Nicks
May 31, 2016
Robert Nickelsberg—Getty Images

Delta Airlines’ new “innovation lanes” in the security checkpoint at its home airport in Atlanta do more than just add manpower to improve the sluggish passenger screening process. They change the process itself to make it more efficient and cost-effective.

Instead of the single current checkpoint, Delta’s setup introduces five “divestment points”—places where you empty your pockets, remove your belt, and take off your shoes—to speed up the one-at-a-time process whereby you have to wait until the person in front of you is finished before you can empty your things into a bin. An automated system routes bins that trigger an alarm to a separate area for inspecting, so one person’s too-big bottle of hot sauce or laptop left in its case doesn’t hold up the entire line. The system also automatically recirculates empty bins, which means an agent doesn’t have to spend time collecting used bins and ferrying them back to the other side of the checkpoint.

Delta isn’t the only airline that has ponied up money to help address the crisis, but its innovations could be a model for transforming the Transportation Security Administration’s security screenings, which have made headlines in recent weeks as travelers braced to contend with extremely long lines at TSA security checkpoints heading into the summer travel season. Delays due to TSA gridlock are expected to be so bad that some would-be travelers say they’ll just stay home, leading to a loss of $4.3 billion on travel spending in the U.S.

Read Next: The Best Free Thing to Do in Every State

The carrier says it spent more than a million dollars to implement the new system, which took only two months to launch. The airline claims that its new process—by moving people through faster and offloading Delta customers to its own lanes, thereby freeing up space in the TSA’s old lanes—has led to a 10% improvement in productivity at all checkpoints.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

EDIT POST