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By Ethan Wolff-Mann
October 6, 2015
Bernstein, Aaron P—Getty Images

It’s not surprising to hear that Amazon is dominating e-commerce, but a new survey from e-commerce startup BloomReach quantifies the e-retailer giant’s domination.

According to the 2,000 people surveyed, 44% said they turn to Amazon first when they’re interested in buying something. Since 21% of people Google the product first, that means Amazon beats every other retailer combined by 10 percentage points as the knee-jerk place to inquire about a product. This is not a good outlook for competitors. Or Google, for that matter, since selling ads off product searches is lucrative.

Re/code’s Jason Del Rey noted that a study conducted in 2012 estimated that Amazon’s dominance in e-retail wasn’t quite as complete—with “only” a 30% plurality of market share of first-stops for customers. Still, he observed that the findings of the new study sound quite believable given Amazon’s huge momentum thanks to Amazon Prime and its free two-day shipping.

In addition to steamrolling the e-commerce (and, of course, brick and mortar stores), Amazon is apparently also putting the hurt on colleges. According to the University of Connecticut’s student newspaper, the campus mailroom is flooded with 3,000 packages a day, most presumably sent by Amazon. The situation has required student employees to work deep into the night to handle the immense volume.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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