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By Denver Nicks
January 5, 2016
Lumosity Android Speed Pack
Lumosity Android Speed Pack
courtesy Luminosity

The company that makes Lumosity, “brain training” software billed, among other things, as capable of improving cognitive performance in old age, reached a $2 million settlement announced Tuesday with the Federal Trade Commission.

Per the settlement, Lumosity-maker Lumos Labs will make redress payments to customers and offer a new easy cancellation feature for the auto-billing service. Memberships ranged from $15 per month to $300 for a lifetime.

“Lumosity preyed on consumers’ fears about age-related cognitive decline, suggesting their games could stave off memory loss, dementia, and even Alzheimer’s disease,” said Jessica Rich, director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. ”But Lumosity simply did not have the science to back up its ads.”

According to the FTC, the widely advertised service offered games purported to improve cognitive performance, slow down decline, and recover more fully from injury. According to the FTC complaint, Luminosity used Google AdWords to target marketing materials to users searching for keywords related to memory, cognition, dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

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