Best Colleges in America 2022
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Overall Score: 80.54

Wellesley College

Wellesley College is one of the Seven Sisters, the prestigious consortium of East Coast women's colleges once seen as the female equivalent of the predominantly male Ivy League. Decades later, the Massachusetts-based Wellesley still attracts an impressive group of applicants: In the class of 2026, nine out of 10 students were ranked in the top 10% of their high school class. The college has a student-faculty ratio of 7:1, and professors teach only two courses per semester, allowing them time for one-on-one work with the school's nearly 2,400 students. Wellesley prides itself on educating future leaders, and students don't have to look far for examples, since women make up the bulk of senior leadership on campus. Some of its most well-known alums include the late former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, Hillary Clinton, author Nora Ephron and broadcast journalist Diane Sawyer. Among the school's 180 student organizations are a set of co-ops, including a student-run pub called Punch's Alley, which hosts such gatherings as a Lizzo listening party and viewing of Beyonce's Homecoming.

Costs

Est. full price 2022-2023
$80,500
% of students who get any grants
60%
Est. price for students who receive aid
$22,800
Average price for low-income students
$9,670

Admissions

Acceptance rate
22%
Median SAT/ACT score
1450/33
SAT/ACT required?
No
Undergraduate enrollment
2,390

Financial Aid

% of students with need who get grants
97%
% of need met
100%
% of students who get merit grants
N/A
Average merit grant
N/A

Student Success

Graduation rate
93%
Average time to a degree
4.1 years
Median student debt
$10,700
Early career earnings
$66,530
% earning more than a high school grad
80%

Notes: Students who get merit grants are full-time undergraduates who had no financial need and were awarded grants. Graduation rate measures degree completion within six years for both transfer students and first-time students. Early career earnings are the median earnings for both graduates and non-completers, 10 years after they first enrolled.

Sources: U.S. Department of Education, Peterson’s, Money/Witlytic calculations.

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